The trip

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After coming back from my trip to London, I had the chance to visit a contemporary jewellery exhibition at Eleni Marneri Gallery here in Athens. The gallery showcased the works of the students at the Art Workshop of Chalkida, which is just an hour drive from Athens.

The Art Workshop was created in 1978 by the painters Chariklia and Dimitris Mytaras with the support of Yianis Spanos, who was the mayor at the time. Jewellery lessons begun in 2000 and initially Akis Gkoumas and Despina Pantazopoulou were the instructors. Poly Nikolopoulou, who is an Alchimia alumna, has been teaching together with Akis Gkoumas since October.

The show was called “To Taxidi” (The Trip) and although it was originally planned to take place from 14-23.02.2013 it was extended till 02.03.13. The creators of the pieces are new and not-so-new students at the workshop and although Poly’s and Akis’ ‘touch’ is definitely visible in their work, all creators have their own voice and style.

Take a look.

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Anastasia Papakyriakou - Necklace: Papier mache. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Anastasia Papakyriakou – Necklace: Papier mache. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Maria Basina - Rings: plastic, paint. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Maria Basina – Rings: plastic, paint. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

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Marianthi Spyrou. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Marianthi Spyrou. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Eleni Allagianni and Rodoula Samartzi - various pieces. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Eleni Allagianni and Rodoula Samartzi – various pieces. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Georgia Biliri - Bracelets: Wood, bronze, paint. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Georgia Biliri – Bracelets: Wood, bronze, paint. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Despina Theodorou - Rings: wood. Evaggelia Neroutsou: Earrings and ring: resin, cookies. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Despina Theodorou – Rings: wood. Evaggelia Neroutsou: Earrings and ring: resin, cookies. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Maria Apostolou - Pins and ring. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Maria Apostolou – Pins and ring. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

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Poly Nikolopoulou. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Poly Nikolopoulou. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Poly Nikolopoulou and Eleni Marneri. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Poly Nikolopoulou and Eleni Marneri. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Thank you for reading 🙂

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“…and by far, the most terrifying things are those which elude us.”

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The first time I went to Mexico City it was for a short business trip in April 2008 and I was totally unprepared for what I encountered. The trip was an eye-opener because like many others, I too had a romantic notion in my mind of what South America and its people would be like. My colleagues kept warning me to “lay low”, “watch my back” and “always call a taxi from the hotel” (to avoid those taxi drivers who would “kidnap” me). Still, I took every chance I had to walk the streets with my camera.

On every street corner, armed police officers kept watch with their machine guns and their tanks; next to them there was always a group of kids laughing and playing. Everybody went about their business with a smile on their face; street vendors and cleaners carried their heavy goods and tools; nurses gave flu shots to patients in the metro station; shamans performed purifying rituals on tourists.

On the one hand, in less than 5 days, I had experienced several rides alone on the Mexican metro, a ‘biggish’ earthquake and a city sewer flood… On the other hand, I had the time of my life in a small salsa club where you had to dance, even though you didn’t know how to. I watched a cat play with the sunbeams in Frida Kahlo’s garden. I stood next to the most magnificent monuments dedicated to the Gods of the Sun and the Moon after a heart-breaking, one-hour drive through the surrounding city slums. However, what I remember most of all are the people with their beautiful smiles and their sad eyes. What violence these eyes must have witnessed.

Enter Jorge Manilla, a Mexican contemporary jewellery artist who reminded me of all this a few days ago, when he spoke to me about his work. I first noticed him last year when one of his pieces was on the “Under that Cloud” exhibition and I was very happy to hear about his new work, which, in my opinion, reflects the happiness, the sadness and the violence that is Mexico.

He describes his series “Te mato por que te amo” (I kill you because I love you) as the sum of thoughts and memories of psychological and physical violence. “When I was working, I read a lot about violence, what philosophers like Georges Bataille write about it, with his texts on eroticism, violence, and death” Jorge explains.

By observing how people and the media deal with violence, he found out that the line between man and animal is very thin. “For some people violence is living proof that man is a savage… for other people it is the road to civility” he points out in his statement.

In his work, Jorge does not judge; he treats all emotions equally and creates pieces, which are witnesses to both the Good and Evil inside all of us. Like another kind of shaman, Jorge performs his own purifying ritual on emotions and transcribes fear, passion, jealousy, pain, sadness and love into the materials he uses: ash, charcoal, pigments, dried flowers, bones and fabric from old t-shirts and bags. Objects of life and death are enclosed in small containers and are sprayed with foam. As the foam fails to escape this violent grip, it explodes and transforms into something new. Before the pieces are ready, Jorge performs the last step of purification; he burns them.

Jorge has been living and working in Belgium for the last 9 years. He misses Mexico and sounds very nostalgic when he talks about his home. The second time I go to Mexico I hope to meet him there, living and working in his city.

Jorge’s work will be exhibited during this year’s Schmuck at Atelier Shari Pierce from 6-9 March 2013, in Munich.

Contemporary Savagery – La violencia del latin Violentia

“For some people violence is living proof that man is a savage… for other people it is the road  to civility. Regardless of our understanding or appreciation of the subject, the only thing that we can be sure of is that violence is a part of our human nature.

While researching for this project, I found that most of the time humans perceive, relate to each other and are motivated through their raw emotions. For example: fear, passion, jealousy, cowardice, pain, rancor, bad blood, sadness and even love are concepts that are buried within the reasons for violence. This range of diverse emotion, rational and irrational, are the reasons why violence became the source of inspiration for my work.

In my artistic research, I decided not to work literally with violence but with violent thoughts, feelings and memories. I explore In which moment we become a victim and in which moment we are the victimizers? As a result, I have made troubled objects in non-attractive shapes with surprising and frightening images. I created the imperfect perfection, black images that mirror and reflect our imperfect reallity. My materials create cataclysmic scenes, explosions that seem to melt the objects.  

In the end my objects are no longer merely materials and distorted shapes but rather dissected feelings, broken memories, and dry organs that reveal a naked soul and the fragility of our situation”. Jorge Manilla

Jorge Manilla - "Contemporary Savagery" 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla – “Contemporary Savagery” 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla - "Contemporary Savagery" 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla – “Contemporary Savagery” 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla - "Contemporary Savagery" 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla – “Contemporary Savagery” 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla - "Contemporary Savagery" 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla – “Contemporary Savagery” 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla - "Contemporary Savagery" 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla – “Contemporary Savagery” 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla - "Contemporary Savagery" 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla – “Contemporary Savagery” 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla - "Contemporary Savagery" 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla – “Contemporary Savagery” 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla - "Contemporary Savagery" 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla – “Contemporary Savagery” 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla - "Contemporary Savagery" 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

Jorge Manilla – “Contemporary Savagery” 2012. Necklace: mixed materials. Photographer: Hanne Nieberding. Photo courtesy of the artist

All photos are courtesy of the artist.
Photographer: Hanne Nieberding
Title quote: Georges Bataille

Thank you for reading 🙂

Unexpected treasures?

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What’s the first thing you do, when you plan your next trip to another city or country? What I do even before I book my tickets and hotel rooms is to check the local museums or galleries for any contemporary jewellery exhibitions they might be having.

The difficulty with traveling to London, however, is deciding which exhibitions I will NOT be going to, due to lack of time, not will mind you… So, last week I was lucky enough to catch the “Unexpected Pleasures” show at the Design Museum in London. The exhibition was curated by Australian jewellery and tableware designer, Susan Cohn, who gives us an overview of 126 international designers and their work, from the beginning of contemporary jewellery till today. Although some of the pieces appear ‘normal’, most of them challenge wearability as well as gravity, which makes the whole show even more enjoyable and to the point: contemporary jewellery can be made out of any kind of material.

You can visit the exhibition at the Design Museum till 3rd March 2013 and you can read more about Susan Cohn‘s choice of artists and pieces here.

"Unexpected Pleasures" exhibition. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

“Unexpected Pleasures” exhibition. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Susanne Klemm - "Frozen" (2007). Necklace: Polyolefin, heated and distorted. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Susanne Klemm – “Frozen” (2007). Necklace: Polyolefin, heated and distorted. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Susanne Klemm - "Frozen" (2007), detail. Necklace: Polyolefin, heated and distorted. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Susanne Klemm – “Frozen” (2007), detail. Necklace: Polyolefin, heated and distorted. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Dorothea Prühl - "Habicht" (Hawk) (2006). Necklace: Elm wood. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Dorothea Prühl – “Habicht” (Hawk) (2006). Necklace: Elm wood. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Lisa Walker - Untitled (2009). Necklace: Plastic, thread. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Lisa Walker – Untitled (2009). Necklace: Plastic, thread. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Lisa Walker - Untitled (2009). Necklace: Plastic, thread. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Lisa Walker – Untitled (2009). Necklace: Plastic, thread. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Marjorie Schick - Spiralling Disks (2006). Necklaces and bracelets: painted wood. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Marjorie Schick – Spiralling Disks (2006). Necklaces and bracelets: painted wood. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Photographic installation. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Photographic installation. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Photographic installation. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Photographic installation. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Gijs Bakker - "Dew Drop" (1982). Necklace: laminated paper. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Gijs Bakker – “Dew Drop” (1982). Necklace: laminated paper. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Lucy Sarneel - "Mourning Piece" (2008). Necklace: antique textiles on rubber, silver, thread, zinc. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Lucy Sarneel – “Mourning Piece” (2008). Necklace: antique textiles on rubber, silver, thread, zinc. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Pavel Opocensky - Untitled (2008). Brooch: colorcore. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Pavel Opocensky – Untitled (2008). Brooch: colorcore. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Tobias Alm - 11th Series number 12 (2011). Brooch: wood, shellac, wood. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Tobias Alm – 11th Series number 12 (2011). Brooch: wood, shellac, wood. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Otto Künzli - "Heart" (1985). Brooch: hard foam, lacquer. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Otto Künzli – “Heart” (1985). Brooch: hard foam, lacquer. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Robert Smit - "Square" (1991). Necklace: gold, paint. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Robert Smit – “Square” (1991). Necklace: gold, paint. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Margaret West - "Memo: Shadow of Faded Daffodil" (2007). Brooch: basalt, paint, silver. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Margaret West – “Memo: Shadow of Faded Daffodil” (2007). Brooch: basalt, paint, silver. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Kaire Rannik - "Inonotus Obliquus" (2010). Brooch: Silver, copper, mirror, steel. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Kaire Rannik – “Inonotus Obliquus” (2010). Brooch: Silver, copper, mirror, steel. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Kazumi Nagano - Untitled (2009). Brooch: Japanese paper, gold, silver pin, nylon thread and Japanese lacquer. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Kazumi Nagano – Untitled (2009). Brooch: Japanese paper, gold, silver pin, nylon thread and Japanese lacquer. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

John Iverson - "Cracked Up" (2009-10). Brooch: sterling silver, 18ct and 14ct gold. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

John Iverson – “Cracked Up” (2009-10). Brooch: sterling silver, 18ct and 14ct gold. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Fabrizio Tridenti - Untitled (2010). Silver, brass, acrylic paint, iron. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Fabrizio Tridenti – Untitled (2010). Silver, brass, acrylic paint, iron. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Jamie Bennett - "Postrpiori 10" (2009). Brooch: Enamel, gold, copper. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Jamie Bennett – “Postrpiori 10” (2009). Brooch: Enamel, gold, copper. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Ted Noten - "Chew your own brooch" (1998). Brooches: gold plated silver, anodized aluminium. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Ted Noten – “Chew your own brooch” (1998). Brooches: gold plated silver, anodized aluminium. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Bernhard Schobinger - Bottlenecklace (1988). Broken-off bottlenecks, metal cord. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Bernhard Schobinger – Bottlenecklace (1988). Broken-off bottlenecks, metal cord. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

"Unexpected Pleasures" exhibition. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

“Unexpected Pleasures” exhibition. Photo by Eleni Roumpou

Thank you for reading 🙂

I heart you

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This Valentine’s day, I’m sharing some love with all my wonderful followers around the net 🙂

A little more than a year ago, when I started this blog, there were not many of us writing about contemporary jewellery online. I remember spending hours and hours of hunting down some great pictures of jewellery to show you. In less than a year, however, Pinterest became this huge thing that it is now, and I was glad to see more artists realize the need of having their own webpage, of having good pictures of their pieces and of how important interaction with their audience is.

I love the challenge of creating more value for you here at my blog, with more interviews, more insights in the work of our favorite artists, more reports from exhibitions and fairs and trust me, there will be more to see this year.

I’ll keep curating my own little Pinterest museum and looking at your updates on my Facebook feed. Twitter, I must admit, is not something that I’ve grown to love, yet; I don’t have the time or energy to interact with as many of you as I would like to but I sure appreciate the fact that I can get the news so fast!

I guess what I’m trying to say is that I learn from and with you every day. You can be sure that each one of your comments, likes and follows do not go unnoticed and make my work here worth the while.

Thank you my lovely WordPress and email followers!

Thank you my lovely WordPress and email followers!

Thank you my lovely Facebookers!

Thank you my lovely Facebookers!

Thank you my lovely Pinterestians!

Thank you my lovely Pinterestians!

Thank you all and keep reading. The best stuff is yet to come 😉

Under our very noses

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How many materials are there in the world?

How many of them can you use to create jewellery?

How many ways are there to change them and create what you have envisioned?

And how many of us actually see what’s right there under our very noses?

In 2008, I discovered that the most precious material of them all, had been quietly sitting in front of me on my soldering bench. Ceramic honeycomb block is better known for its ability to distribute heat during soldering to the thousands who use it, rather than a prized element in a piece of jewellery. Pure, white and hol(e)y I never cease to be captivated by the extraordinary beauty of this material and the endless possibilities it presents.Christel van der Laan

In late 2011, I was fortunate to receive a New Work Grant from the Australia Council for the Arts and a Development Grant from the Department of Culture and the Arts (Western Australia) to spend time researching and developing new work.  Central to the project is the extension of the use of carved ceramic honeycomb block in my work. The grants have enabled me to concentrate on the spontaneous exploration of materials and processes with an emphasis on creating small informal compositions and components that will only later be combined with others into complete works.Christel van der Laan

Christel van der Laan -

Christel van der Laan – “Anemone” (2012). Brooch: painted silver, ceramic honeycomb block

Christen van der Laan

Christen van der Laan – “Holier Than Thou” (2011). Brooch: ceramic honeycomb block, painted silver, microgeodes

Christel van der Laan -

Christel van der Laan – “Holy Smoke” (2010). Brooch: painted silver, ceramic honeycomb block, old clay pipe

Christel van der Laan - "Holier Than Thou" (2009). Brooch: painted silver, ceramic honeycomb block

Christel van der Laan – “Holier Than Thou” (2009). Brooch: painted silver, ceramic honeycomb block

Christel van der Laan - "Holier Than Thou" (2009). Brooch: painted silver, ceramic honeycomb block, micro-geode agates, gold

Christel van der Laan – “Holier Than Thou” (2009). Brooch: painted silver, ceramic honeycomb block, micro-geode agates, gold

Christel van der Laan -

Christel van der Laan – “Bug” (2011). Brooch: painted silver, ceramic honeycomb block, micro-geode agates, electrical part

Christel van der Laan - "Wholeheartedly" (2011). Ring:  carved ceramic honeycomb block, gold

Christel van der Laan – “Wholeheartedly” (2011). Ring: carved ceramic honeycomb block, gold

Made in China

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I’m very glad to inform you all about a new blog on contemporary jewellery that I discovered today. Actually, Anaïs, the writer of the blog, happened to stop by my blog and ‘like’ some of my posts and so I got curious and visited her blog and then ‘liked’ some of her posts and then I came back here and started writing about them and, well, you get the picture.

Anaïs, “a frenchy studying abroad” is finishing her last year in Jewellery and Metal design at Duncan Of Jordanstone in Dundee, Scotland and if I understand correctly, she’s writing a thesis on Chinese contemporary jewellery, which, on the downside, there doesn’t seem to be a lot of, yet! 😉

She really sounds very enthusiastic and in love with contemporary jewellery and I hope that she’ll keep writing in her blog. It’s so exciting to discover new Chinese and other artists like Taiwanese artist Zoe Lulu, who creates wonderful pieces out of rice and resin.

Check out Anaïs’ blog here and Zoe’s blog here.

Zoe Lulu - Rice, resin, embroidery. Photo from http://jewellerychina.wordpress.com

Zoe Lulu – Rice, resin, embroidery. Photo from http://jewellerychina.wordpress.com

Zoe Lulu - Rice, resin, embroidery. Photo from http://jewellerychina.wordpress.com

Zoe Lulu – Rice, resin, embroidery. Photo from http://jewellerychina.wordpress.com

Zoe Lulu - Rice, resin, embroidery. Photo from http://jewellerychina.wordpress.com

Zoe Lulu – Rice, resin, embroidery. Photo from http://jewellerychina.wordpress.com

 

Zoe Lulu - Rice, resin, embroidery. Photo from http://zoeluluswonderland.blogspot.co.uk/

Zoe Lulu – Rice, resin, embroidery. Photo from http://zoeluluswonderland.blogspot.co.uk/

Zoe Lulu - Rice, resin, embroidery. Photo from http://zoeluluswonderland.blogspot.co.uk/

Zoe Lulu – Rice, resin, embroidery. Photo from http://zoeluluswonderland.blogspot.co.uk/

Thank you for reading 🙂

I’m too heavy for my shirt…

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Demi Thomloudis - "Framed In Pink" (2012). Brooch. Cement, sterling silver, pigment, aluminum

Demi Thomloudis – “Framed In Pink” (2012). Brooch. Cement, sterling silver, pigment, aluminum

My latest obsession is called ‘cement’. You would think that cement is the same as concrete only it isn’t. Concrete is a composite construction material composed primarily of aggregate, cement, and water. If I understand this correctly, you can have a concrete wall but not a cement wall, which is funny because in Greek we use ‘cement’ in both cases, e.g. “There is cement in this wall” or “This is a cement wall”…  So, jewellery pieces do not have concrete but cement in them? Or if you make proper concrete and use it, you can call it ‘concrete jewellery’ and not ‘cement jewellery’? Or not? Somebody, help? Anybody?

Anyway, I’ve been doing some research on the material and I love what Demitra Thomloudis and Caroline Holt have done with it.

Demi Thomloudis - "Space on String #1" (2012). Necklace. Cement, steel, sterling silver, fiber, wood, resin, powdercoat.

Demi Thomloudis – “Space on String #1” (2012). Necklace. Cement, steel, sterling silver, fiber, wood, resin, powdercoat.

Demi Thomloudis - "Spaces Framed" (2012). Brooch. Cement, sterling silver, wood, fiber, resin, pigment.

Demi Thomloudis – “Spaces Framed” (2012). Brooch. Cement, sterling silver, wood, fiber, resin, pigment.

Demi Thomloudis - "Framed In Pink" (2012). Brooch. Cement, sterling silver, pigment, aluminum

Demi Thomloudis – “Framed In Pink” (2012). Brooch. Cement, sterling silver, pigment, aluminum

Demi Thomloudis - "Space # 2" (2012). Brooch. Cement, sterling silver, copper, steel, pigment, resin

Demi Thomloudis – “Space # 2” (2012). Brooch. Cement, sterling silver, copper, steel, pigment, resin

Demi Thomloudis - "Space on String # 2" (2012). Necklace. Cement, fiber, wood, steel, resin, pigment

Demi Thomloudis – “Space on String # 2” (2012). Necklace. Cement, fiber, wood, steel, resin, pigment

Demi Thomloudis - Untitled (2012). Brooch. Cement, powdercoat, steel, wood, sterling silver, resin

Demi Thomloudis – Untitled (2012). Brooch. Cement, powdercoat, steel, wood, sterling silver, resin

Demi Thomloudis - Untitled (2012). Brooch. Cement, powdercoat, steel, wood, sterling silver, resin

Demi Thomloudis – Untitled (2012). Brooch. Cement, powdercoat, steel, wood, sterling silver, resin

Demi is “inspired by the fragmentary and responsive aesthetic of informal architectural construction, temporary spaces and bricolage“.

Caroline Holt - "Traces 1" (2010). Pendant. Concrete & horsehair

Caroline Holt – “Traces 1” (2010). Pendant. Concrete & horsehair

Caroline Holt - "Traces 2" (2010). Pendant. Concrete, horsehair & organza print

Caroline Holt – “Traces 2” (2010). Pendant. Concrete, horsehair & organza print

Caroline Holt - "Traces 3" (2010). Pendant. Concrete & horsehair

Caroline Holt – “Traces 3” (2010). Pendant. Concrete & horsehair

Caroline Holt - "Pebbles" (2010). Brooches. Concrete & dyed horsehair

Caroline Holt – “Pebbles” (2010). Brooches. Concrete & dyed horsehair

Caroline Holt - "Arch" (2010). Brooch. Concrete & dyed horsehair

Caroline Holt – “Arch” (2010). Brooch. Concrete & dyed horsehair

Caroline says: “I am fascinated by how a material, such as concrete normally associated with huge structures, can be so tactile and sensitive at the same time. This inspired me to create a series of brooches referencing classical jewellery shapes using an unlikely material such as concrete.

If you’d like to see more pictures like this, don’t forget to follow my ‘Cement‘ album on Pinterest.

Thank you for reading 🙂

Holiday Greetings

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Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year everybody!!!!

Merry Christmas!!!

Mosaic was created with 100 pictures of red jewellery and AndreaMosaic 🙂

Get your lucky charms now

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2013 is around the corner and if you happen to love lucky charms as much as us Greeks do, then this new exhibition in Eleni Marneri gallery is just the right thing for you. “Folk is coming to town” features graphic and jewellery designers inspired by Greek tradition, colours and patterns.

The following artists are exhibiting their lucky charms at the exhibition:

Christina Niarchou, Erato, Kiko, Maria Constanza Ochoa, Maria Mastori, Theodoros, Voula Karampatzaki, Yiannis Siotis, Aimilia Tsekoura, Pissa Stella, Poly Nikolopoulou, Rallou Katsari, Sophia Zarari and Christina Kellidi.

Poly Nikolopoulou - 2013 Charm. Necklace. Photo courtesy of the artist

Poly Nikolopoulou – 2013 Charm. Necklace. Photo courtesy of the artist

Poly Nikolopoulou

Poly Nikolopoulou – “Hidden treasure”. Brooch. Wood, gold leaf, silver. Photo from http://www.elenimarneri.com

Rallou Katsari

Rallou Katsari – “Can you hear me?”. Ring. Silver. Photo from http://www.klimt02.net

Yiannis Siotis

Yiannis Siotis – “Darkness & Light IV”. Bracelet. Silver, fire sapphires, epoxy resin. Photo from http://www.elenimarneri.com

Christina Niarchou

Christina Niarchou – “You have message!” Necklaces. Copper,color. Photo from http://www.elenimarneri.com

Maria Constanza Ochoa

Maria Constanza Ochoa – “Circle Roots”. Ring. 18k gold, iron. Photo from http://www.elenimarneri.com

Thanks for reading 🙂

Enameled is better?

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Sometimes, I still miss living in Cologne, not only because I can’t visit the Dom, study in the library or take a walk at the gardens of the Japan Foundation or eat a nice currywurst along the Rhein but also because I’m missing out on exhibitions such as the one taking place right now at Gallery Pilartz.

I love enamel, I admire the artists that are showing their work there and if I can’t see their pieces live I guess I’ll just make due with the following pictures…

Ramon Puig Cuyàs

Ramon Puig Cuyàs – “N°1280 Primacolor II”. Brooch. Silver, nickel silver, plastic, enamel, acrylic color. Photo from http://www.pilartz.com

Ramon Puig Cuyàs

Ramon Puig Cuyàs – “N°1281 Primacolor II”. Brooch. Silver, nickel silver, plastic, enamel, acrylic color. Photo from http://www.pilartz.com

Beate Eismann

Beate Eismann – Necklace. Photo from http://www.beate-eismann.de

Beate Eismann

Beate Eismann – Brooch. Photo from http://www.beate-eismann.de

Simone Giesen

Simone Giesen – “Waben Weiss”. Brooch. Copper, steel, enamel. Photo from http://www.klimt02.net

Julia Turner

Julia Turner – “White Scaffold”. Brooch. Wood, steel, enamel. Photo from https://www.facebook.com/juliavturner

Danni Schwaag

Danni Schwaag – Brooch. Mother of pearl, enamel on copper, ebony, gold. Photo from http://www.pilartz.com

Danni Schwaag

Danni Schwaag – Brooch. Mother of pearl, enamel on copper, ebony, gold. Photo from http://www.pilartz.com

Silvia Walz

Silvia Walz – “Fernandos Haus”. Brooch. Silver, copper, enamel. Photo from http://www.pilartz.com

Silvia Walz

Silvia Walz – “Victors Haus”. Brooch. Silver, copper, enamel. Photo from http://www.pilartz.com

Isabell Schaup

Isabell Schaup – Brooch. Silver, enamel, coral. Photo from http://www.wearableartblog.com

Isabell Schaup

Isabell Schaup – Cactus brooch. Silver, copper, enamel, a photo, coral, fabric. Photo from http://www.wearableartblog.com

Ike Jünger

Ike Jünger – Brooch. Silver, gold, enamel. Photo from http://www.pilartz.com

Ike Jünger

Ike Jünger – Brooch. Silver, gold, enamel. Photo from http://www.pilartz.com

Silvia Weidenbach

Silvia Weidenbach – Fractal Invention “Don’t go for the Rollercoaster!” – Necklace. Z-corp 3D Print, silver, enamel, gold. Photo from http://www.silviaweidenbach.com

I’d love to hear your comments on the exhibition, if you visit it!

Thanks for reading 🙂